Archive for September, 2007

“The Liberty Challenge”

September 4, 2007

McClelland Law Firm, P.C. Issues “The Liberty Challenge”
Ed Chasteen is a friend and valued member of our community. As the Founder and President of HateBusters, Inc. (a Missouri Not-for-profit, 501 ( c)(3) organization) Ed spends 10 months every year helping people who get hurt because someone hates them because of their race, color or national origin. Ed spends the other two months raising money to help people who have Multiple Sclerosis. Ed has Multiple Sclerosis. If he rides his bicycle, he can run; if he doesn’t, he can’t walk.

The months of August and September, Ed devotes to raising money to fight Multiple Sclerosis. On the weekend after Labor Day, the Mid America Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, holds it’s MS-150 Bike Ride. Hundreds (2000 riders is their goal this year.) of riders will meet in Kansas City this year early on the morning of Saturday, September 7. They will ride to the State Fair Grounds in Sedalia for the night, then by a roundabout route to Warrensburg on Sunday: 150 miles in all.

Each rider is required to raise a minimum of $200. Altogether last year they raised over half a million dollars. Ed’s personal goal this year is $10.00 a mile, $1,500.00 in all. He is trying to raise this money the same way he made it across the country from Orlando to Seattle to Anaheim on his bike. By asking for help. Ed asked our law firm to help. We responded with “The Liberty Challenge”.

For the second year in a row McClelland Law Firm, P.C. is more than happy and pleased to support Ed and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, on such a worthwhile endeavor. As we contemplated how we could encourage others in the Liberty community to also join in, by supporting Ed and the MS-150, it came to us-“The Liberty Challenge”. We have agreed to donate to Ed and the MS-150, a payment of $100.00 for every (2)Liberty business or (2) residents that contribute $100.00 to the MS-150, up to a maximum of $500.00 of matching contributions. That way Ed will have raised $500 from us, and $100 x 10 businesses or 10 residents, or any combination thereof, ($100 x 10 = $1000) = $1500.00 total, the goal Ed has set for himself.

Please join us in supporting such a worthwhile organization and our fellow community friends by making your check out to MS-150 and send it to Ed at the address below.

Ed will write a story about the ride, and he will send a copy to everyone who contributes. Ed will send you a report of the money you helped to raise for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. We thank you in advance for your support.

Make checks payable to MS-150. Send them to Box 442, Liberty, MO 64069

McClelland Law Firm P.C.
The Flagship Building
200 Westwoods Drive
Liberty, MO 64068

HateBusters
Box 442
Liberty, MO 64069
Phone: 816-803-8371
e-mail: hatebuster@aol.com

No Boundaries On Our Soul!

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Don Quixote Across Missouri

September 4, 2007

By Ed Chasteen

Their quest for peace and justice drew the 22 of them together from across America and three other countries. From San Francisco they set out in mid-June, bound for Washington, DC in late August. On Tuesday, July 23 they arrived in Kansas City, where they were housed for two nights by seven different faith communities: Baha’i, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh. Hosts and riders came on Wednesday night to the Human Family Reunion at William Jewell College, where, in recognition of their impossible dream, each rider and each host was given the Don Quixote Award.

Received by the City of Kansas City, Missouri at 9 o’clock Thursday morning on the steps of City Hall, riders were lauded by city officials and interviewed by the media, then ushered through city streets by police motorcycles to begin our 60 mile trek to homes for the night in Warrensburg.

Precisely on schedule at 6 PM Thursday evening, the last of us arrive at the old train station, now the Chamber of Commerce in Warrensburg. By ones, twos and threes we are assigned homes in town and whisked away by our hosts. Long conversations over great food and sleep of the innocent fuel us for our early departure to Sedalia. A police car escorts us from the edge of town to First Baptist Church, our home for Friday night.

Melvin Kerr has again this year arranged our place for the night and dinner. At three o’clock, Melvin takes us to a hundred or so eager children at the Boys and Girls Club. They’re fascinated by the sight of our bikes and our tales from the road. Bev and Bill Chapman have again planned our evening. Opening night for their community theater. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Laughter soothes tired bodies.

Our second night together on the road. Bicycles ring the room. Hard, sun-toned bodies stretch out on bags beneath basketball goals on a gymnasium floor. Sleeping idealism soon will rouse. With first light early risers will carry their bikes up the long flight of stairs to the street and search their way through the not-yet-quite-light of early dawn through the town to the bicycle trail that will take us to our next home for the night some 80 miles away.

With the sun on this late July Missouri day comes triple digit heat and stifling humidity. Riders fight a barely winning battle to take in more water than they lose, a Niagara of sweat replenished by a fresh water ocean strapped to their backs and caged in bottles on their bikes.

Riding the Katy Trail from Sedalia to Jefferson City adds more than 20 miles in distance but eliminates the hills and the traffic. But we arrive on the wrong side of the Missouri River. The bridge has no bike lane. It’s nearing 6 o’clock when the last of us arrive and our police escort can lead us over. We’re late for the dinner prepared by CURE-Christians United for Racial Equity. Our tardiness is no problem. Good food and cold drink in giant quantity await. Then we all share stories of the better world we see and struggle to make real. Then to bed next door at the YMCA.

Highway 94 and the Katy Trail parrallel each other most of the way from Jefferson City to St. Louis. The trail is shady and flat, but the surface is softer than the road and rough in places. The road is hard and hot and mostly flat, but here and there climbs out of the river valley up and down long hills. Marthasville sits to either side of the trail about 60 miles east of Jeff City and is our destination for this Sunday night.

“What time is it?” Mike asks. “Ten thirty,” I say. “They begin services at eleven.” Mike is pointing to a church sign off to our left in a little town. We’re riding 94. “We were passing by and wanted to come to church,” I say as we enter the sanctuary where an older adults class is meeting. They welcome us and want to hear our story. When services end at noon, a kind woman gives us money for lunch and tells us of a café in the next town seven miles away.

With no appointed time to arrive and no program planned for tonight, today’s ride has no urgency, and the last of us arrive shortly before dark. Four years running we have stayed here in the community center just beside the trail. What gracious hosts. Dinner is waiting. After an air conditioned night sprawled in sleeping bags on the floor breakfast comes.

At last an overcast day. And a tail wind. The trail runs another 35 miles and ends in St. Charles. But the new plan is to leave the trail at Matson and take 94 into St. Louis. Tonight our ride across Missouri will end with an overnight stay at the Herbert Hoover Boy’s and Girl’s Club in a derelict section of abandoned factories.

Dale Ahle will pick me up, and we will drive back to Liberty. After a rest day in St. Louis, the Bike-Aid riders will head for D.C. They arrive on August 18 and will meet with their Congressional Representatives to share with them the picture of America they have developed in their nine-week ride across the country.

Brian and I miss the Matson exit. So do three women riders. We are almost in St. Charles and decide to continue. We’re starving. We find a pizza place. We call to let the others know where we are. The last of the boys and girls go home at five o’clock and the noise level in the Club drops dramatically. We are all in by seven. Dale is coming for me at eight.

Suddenly I’m surrounded by riders. Someone has a pie. Another has a half-gallon of Bryer’s Vanilla Ice Cream. All during our five days across Missouri, riders would come up to me. “Do you have a story for me?” They would ask. I did. I told them. But why were they asking? I was glad they were. But such constant requests for stories had never happened before.

Bryer’s Ice Cream was one story. I had told them that I’m usually too excited and too busy at our Human Family Reunions to eat. So when it’s over, I go home and eat a whole half-gallon of Bryer’s Vanilla Ice Cream.

I had told stories to them about riding my bicycle alone and without money from Orlando to Seattle to LA, looking for that spark of goodness and genius I see in all people. I had told them about starting HateBusters when a Klansman was elected to the Louisiana Legislature and being invited by the governor to come help the state redeem itself.

I had told them about the protesters who came with hate signs when a black speaker was invited to William Jewell College. I didn’t want anyone to think I agreed with them. I made myself a sign and joined them. My sign said, “THESE GUYS ARE NUTS”. The crowd started to laugh. The protesters got in their cars and left.

When several of the riders invite me to ride on with them to Washington, I know that during our week together we have become friends. These idealistic and naïve good people have recognized our kinship. When people tell me that I am naïve I say “Thank you. I mean to be. If someone isn’t, all of us might quit believing in the goodness of people and the virtues of loyalty and fairness. I choose to believe. And to act out of that belief.”

Dale comes. I hug everyone I can reach. Brian wheels my bike out to Dale’s van. We have been on the road a while when Dale asks, “Did anyone ask you to tell them a story this week?”

“YES! How did you know?

“I told the two girls who stayed with Julie and me. I told them Ed knows some great stories you need to hear. Ask him.”

HateBusters
Box 442
Liberty, MO 64069
Phone: 816-803-8371
e-mail: hatebuster@aol.com

No Boundaries On Our Soul!

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Copyright (c) 2000-2007 http://www.hatebusters.com and TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
All rights reserved.

Comin’ To Kansas City

September 4, 2007

Bike-Aid is coming to Kansas City! Amazing and inspiring people from all across America. Twenty-two in number. From 18 to 60 in age. Including teachers, students, an engineer, a financial consultant, a retail manager, a physician’s assistant, a journalist, an educational researcher. Bike-Aid journeys by bicycle from San Francisco to Washington, D.C. every summer to spread their message of peace and justice. On July 23 and 24 they will be hosted and housed by Kansas City families of various faiths.

Central Baptist Seminary is located at 29th and Minnesota in KCK. Central Seminary is dedicated and determined to be a good neighbor to those who live nearby and those who come from afar. By serving as a reception center and a place for riders to get mail each summer, Central seeks to demonstrate its love for people who journey our way and need a welcome.

Bike-Aid riders will arrive at Central Seminary in mid-afternoon of July 23. Riders will be met by their host families of different faiths, and by ones and twos will go home with them for the night. Riders will spend the following day with their hosts, and all will come at 6:30 in the evening of July 24 to William Jewell College for a big party we call the Human Family Reunion. Hosts will bring their favorite foods and we will all have a wonderful time getting to know one another. All of Kansas City is invited. Bring your favorite food and come.

Bike-Aid and hosts will also be our dinner guests this night, bringing together for a Camelot moment these awesome folks. We will expect magic when for one brief shining moment people of such idealism and energy come together. It will be an evening none in attendance will ever forget as HateBusters bestows upon the 24 Bike-Aid team members the Don Quixote (DQ) Award. For dreaming the impossible dream. For going where the brave dare not go. For fighting with their last ounce of courage against the unbeatable foe.

Then on the morning of July 25 we will all come together on the steps of City Hall for a rally and a sendoff for the Bike-Aid team as they head for St. Louis and on to D.C. HateBusters invites local riders to join us for the ride to St. Louis. We will spend nights in Warrensburg, Sedalia, Jeff City, Marthasville and St. Louis. We will say reluctant goodbyes to our Bike-Aid friends in St. Louis and come back to Kansas City on Amtrack.

To take part in any or all of these magical moments contact Ed Chasteen at HateBusters Headquarters.

HateBusters
Box 442 816/792-2272 cell phone 816-803-8371
Liberty, MO 64069
e-mail: hatebuster@aol.com
http://www.hatebusters.com
HateBusters Help People Who Have been Hurt Because Someone Hates Them

HateBusters
Box 442
Liberty, MO 64069
Phone: 816-803-8371
e-mail: hatebuster@aol.com

No Boundaries On Our Soul!

Web Site Development and Service provided by TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
Copyright (c) 2000-2007 http://www.hatebusters.com and TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
All rights reserved.

HateBusters Bulletin #42

September 4, 2007

Bad Name

Can you remember the first time someone called you a bad name? The one who said it meant to hurt you. Chances are it worked. I think none of us ever really recovers from that first bad name we are called. Forever after that day we are aware that some people want to hurt us and we know they can. Suspicion comes easier; trust, harder. We never again are innocent and open.

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” Not true. Not even close. Here’s the way it really works. “Sticks and stones may break my bones, and I will soon recover, but from the wounds words inflict, I will suffer forever.” It works this way because we all are Porcelain-Nitro People. Each of us is made of porcelain, beautiful and fragile. We are filled with nitroglycerin, easy to explode and deadly when we do.

Those bad names people call us cause us to explode. Nothing else sets off our nitro. That very first bad name may make us explode. Or it may take more. We all have our breaking point, and when it comes, every bad name ever directed at us will have played a part. So when mindless violence erupts and school children gun down their playmates and their teachers, we need not look far to find accomplices.

Each time in our life when we have called someone a bad name, we have moved our place on the planet that much closer to the day the nitro goes off. When it does we likely will not turn inward to look for the cause. We have not meant to make such a thing happen. We could never imagine that we have played a part. Living, though, as we do in a culture of rampant disrespect, we find it almost impossible to recognize what it is we do. That it might be some other way is a thought that may occasionally cross our minds, but with the norms of civility and courtesy made to look weak and foolish, our minds are no longer fertile fields for the garden of peace and delight.

As we move about daily among people, we have our radar on alert, expecting any moment to pick up the latest verbal torpedo coming our way. Too many times from too many directions those hurtful words have come. Now we are prepared to hear them. We hear them even when they are not said. Innocent remarks now come laden with deadly freight because in our rush to defend ourselves, we see malevolence where none is intended. Shoot first, ask later has become our strategy for survival.

Such thinking has brought us to a strange and alien land where shooting off our mouth leads quickly to shooting off guns. We, who are the walking wounded in this put-down culture, don’t have the eyes to see that we are dead already when that accretion of bad names has crushed the heart and soul from us. We may for a time move about as manikins, but where is the life, the joy of each new day that is our right?

At some time to every person sorrow comes. Accidents happen. Disease has its way with us. Loved ones leave us. And we are sad. Solace comes to us when those around us bind up our sagging spirits in soothing words. In times like these we understand the power of words to transform us. That power, though, has always been there. Since the day we came into the world, words have been sculpting and etching us and making us into the persons we become. And if one day we explode, someone with the power to play back the words spoken to us could make sense of what we have done.

I know not what course others may choose, but as for me, give me simple gifts. Let me walk in the valley of peace and delight. Let me hold every human life sacred. Let me expect goodness and genius in everyone I meet. Let me trust without exception. Let me speak loving and encouraging words. Let me help us find a way to a place where all of us smile and say soothing words to one another and no nitro is ever again set off. It’s not that bad names are banned in the garden of peace and delight. They never occur to anyone. Minds set on other things are not tuned to this frequency.

Come; let us be about this task.

HateBusters Bulletin is a publication of HateBusters, Inc.,
Box 442, Liberty, Missouri 64069
phone 816/792-2272 mobile, 816-803-8371 email: HateBuster@aol.com

HateBusters
Box 442
Liberty, MO 64069
Phone: 816-803-8371
e-mail: hatebuster@aol.com

No Boundaries On Our Soul!

Web Site Development and Service provided by TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
Copyright (c) 2000-2007 http://www.hatebusters.com and TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
All rights reserved.

Calling All HateBusters

September 4, 2007


A plea from Ed Chasteen
Come join me in celebrating the life and work of my dear friend, Al Brooks
Saturday, May 18 at 9 AM
Meet at the office of Move Up
3330 Troost Kansas City, MO

I met Al the first week I was in Kansas City. The year was 1964. I was a grad student from the University of Missouri-Columbia. I had come to Kansas City to study the Civil Rights Movement as it developed in Kansas City. Al was a leader in that movement. We both were young then. Al turns 70 in May. I will be 67 in November. We have been friends since the day we met. We have worked together all these years to make Greater Kansas City a good place for all people.

As part of the events celebrating the 70th birthday of Mayor Pro-tem Alvin Brooks, I’m asking all HateBusters to be a part of Move Up’s March Against Crime and Violence on Saturday, May 18, 2002. The event begins with registration at 9:00 AM, welcoming ceremonies at 9:45. At 10:00 AM we begin a two mile march to Legacy Park, located at the Kaufmann Foundation.

Move Up has asked HateBusters to field a team of six or more for the March Against Crime and Violence. Each team member will receive a free commemorative t-shirt to wear in the March. The shirts will be available for pickup at the Move Up office at 9 AM on May 18, the day of the March. A registration fee of $25.00 per person is requested as a contribution to Move Up in honor of Al’s 70th birthday.

Walking is hard for me. I plan to ride my bike and join the March. I’m hoping that dozens of you who get this message will join me. Please send me an email message telling me that you plan to March so I can make a list of all the HateBusters who take part. I will make this list available to the media and to all of our supporters so that will know what good things we do. Each of us will contribute $25.00 to Move Up. We will get a t-shirt. And we will help Move Up in their work to reduce crime and violence in our good city.

HateBusters
Box 442
Liberty, MO 64069
Phone: 816-803-8371
e-mail: hatebuster@aol.com

No Boundaries On Our Soul!

Web Site Development and Service provided by TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
Copyright (c) 2000-2007 http://www.hatebusters.com and TakeCareOfMyWebSite.com.
All rights reserved.